Fry Bread House

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This place is so good! I’m embarrassed to admit that I’ve only recently visited here for the first time. Especially being a Phoenix native living close to Guadalupe who grew up on Fry Bread with honey and powdered sugar. Of course my expectations were high for my first visit to Fry Bread House – James Beard recognized and the Green Chili Beef Taco voted as a top dish from AZCentral’s Dominic Armato. Plus all its history here in the Valley going back to when it opened in 1992. The restaurant is located within the Melrose district (after a couple relocations). The decor pays homage to Native American culture with plenty of pictures and a Man in the Maze motif standing in place of a welcome mat. The roped off line to the ordering area at first confused me but I eventually caught on. There was a good mixed crowd here and plenty of regulars. Even though I already had my mind set on the taco, the Chumuth Burro, the Red Chili stew and the Hominy stew with plain fry bread called out to me from the menu on the wall as I waited. Service was quick and easy and they really try to move the line. The green chili taco was a lot bigger than I thought. I’m not going to lie, it was also a bit sloppy to eat. But when you stuff a fry bread with all that yummy gooey goodness it’s probably not going to hold together for long. The fry bread is light and crisp and folded into a taco shape. The chili beef was nice and tender with cheese and the perfect amount of spiciness for me. It was a pretty good meal for $9 and good first experience for me. I’m dying to try that stew next time around. I’m also looking forward to introducing some of my Native buddies to this place.

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Green Chili Beef Taco

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The Fry Bread House Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

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New Year’s Hoppin’ John

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Ingredients

8 oz pork tenderloin
2 Roma tomatoes
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 1/2 cup water
1 cup jambalaya rice mix (half a 12 oz package)
1 can (about 15 oz) black-eyed peas

Cut pork into bite-size pieces and chop tomatoes. Heat oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Salute pork until browned and cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove pot from heat. Move pork to a plate and cover to keep warm. Carefully add water to pot. Bring to a boil over high heat. Stir in jambalaya and reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer 20 minutes. Meanwhile, rinse and drain peas. When rice is done, turn off heat and stir in pork, tomatoes and peas. Cover with lid and let sit off heat 5 minutes.

Sausage and White Bean Soup with Winter Greens

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  • 1 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 package (12 oz) chicken sausage, sliced
  • 1 can (16 oz) white beans
  • 1 can (15 oz) “no salt added” diced tomatoes with basil, garlic and oregano
  • 1 can (15 oz) reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 3 cups chopped baby kale, spinach or chard
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Heat oil in large pot over medium heat. Add sausage slices and cook 2 minutes. Add undrained beans, undrained tomatoes and broth. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer and cook 10 minutes. Add greens and cook just until they are bright green and tender, about 2 minutes. Season with pepper to taster.

Hatch Chiles

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I love hatch chile season! Around this time of year, our neighboring state New Mexico harvests and ships these delicious chiles to Arizona for us to roast and spice up some of our favorite dishes (they are grown in a town called Hatch). They are calorie and cholesterol-free and high in fiber and vitamin A & C. Roasting them is the best way to bring out the flavors. It’s fun and easy and really balances out the flavors in many dishes. But be careful – they can be hot!

 Roasting Hatch Chiles

* – from azcentral

1. Because touching fresh chiles can sting the skin, it’s best to wear disposable gloves when handling. Select chiles that are firm to the touch and devoid of puckering, a sign the chiles are beginning to deteriorate. Wash well and dry.

2. Place chiles on a grill and roast about 3 minutes until the skin begins to blister. The key is blistering the skin without cooking the chile.

3. When chiles are blistered on one side, use long tongs to turn them. Continue until the chiles are generously blistered on all sides. Place in a plastic bag, seal and allow to sweat for about 5 minutes. Sweating loosens the blistered skin.

4. Place chiles under running water and gently “pop” or pull off the stem. Use your fingers to remove the skin.

5. When done, the chiles will be ready to chop and use in your favorite dish. Or wrap well in freezer-proof bags, and the chiles will keep for up to a year, or until next year’s fresh harvest.

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Speed Scratch Hatch Chile Cornbread

* – from Shockingly Delicious

Ingredients
1/3 cup milk
1 egg
2 Hatch chiles, roasted, peeled, seeded and chopped
1 (8.5-ounce) box Jiffy Corn Muffin Mix

Instructions
Heat oven to 400F degrees. Spray a 9- by 5-inch loaf pan with nonstick spray and set aside.
In a 4-cup measure, add milk. Add egg and whisk well with a fork to combine. Stir in chiles. Stir in corn muffin mix, just until moist. Do not overmix. Allow to rest undisturbed for 4 minutes for maximum crown.
Restir slightly and scrape into prepared loaf pan. Bake for 20 minutes. Remove from oven, allow to cool for a couple of minutes, and serve warm.
Serves 4.

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New Year’s Day Lab Party

At my job, we sometimes have to work the holidays. You can let it drag you down or you can make it fun (the time and a half pay always gives a nice few extra bucks to the paycheck). All of us in the lab got together and decided to bring some food and have a little party to start the New Year. Someone brought a tortellini pasta and some brownies. I kept with the tradition of New Years and made a chili with black-eyed peas. Eating black-eyed peas on New Years day brings good luck and is thought to bring prosperity. It was really good and I posted the recipe below.

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BLACK-EYED-PEA CHILI

Ingredients

  • 1 can (about 15 ounces) black-eyed peas
  • 2 cups halved grape tomatoes
  • 8 ounces 90 percent lean beef
  • 1 cup diced onions
  • 1 tablespoon chili pepper
  • 1 tablespoon ketchup
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 avocado
  • juice of 1 lime, divided use
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Rinse and drain peas. Combine half the peas and half the tomatoes in a food processor; blend until smooth. Heat a wide-bottom pot over medium-high. Add beef; cook and crumble until browned. Move beef to a bowl. Add half the onions and remaining tomatoes to the pot. Saute until tender, 1 to 2 minutes. Return beef to pot. Stir in bean-to-mato puree, chili powder, ketchup, and water. Simmer, uncovered, 15 minutes. Meanwhile, mash avocado with half the lime juice and half the cilantro; set aside. Stir the remaining lime juice and cilantro into the chili. Dish chili into bowls and top with the avocado mash.